Relay Medal Tally // Emma Anna

Relay Medal Tally // Emma Anna
10 metre Platform // Wendy Black

10 metre Platform // Wendy Black
WINNER // Danielle Karalus & Jen Rae

WINNER // Danielle Karalus & Jen Rae
WINNER // Danielle Karalus & Jen Rae

WINNER // Danielle Karalus & Jen Rae
Transcending Rhythms // Marynes Avila

Transcending Rhythms // Marynes Avila
Transcending Rhythms // Marynes Avila

Transcending Rhythms // Marynes Avila
10 metre Platform // Wendy Black

10 metre Platform // Wendy Black
Relay Medal Tally // Emma Anna

Relay Medal Tally // Emma Anna
Transcending Rhythms // Marynes Avila

Transcending Rhythms // Marynes Avila
To Have a Win // David Turley

To Have a Win // David Turley
Pace Maker // Clare McCracken

Pace Maker // Clare McCracken
Pace Maker // Clare McCracken

Pace Maker // Clare McCracken

 

Notion of Human Movement

Opening on the eve of the XIX Olympiad ‘The Notion of Human Movement’ was a contemporary art exhibition that explored the complex nature of human movement in sport. Commissioned by AMP Capital Investors, the exhibition was the first of its kind to be staged at Bourke Place. Seven artists examined the movement of athletes across a range of interactive installations.

Participating artist, Wendy Black said: “I chose to represent the sport of Platform Diving with my installation ‘Ten Metre Platrform’. I was impressed by the size of the foyer and its moving parts. By utilising the scale and movement of the lifts, I could show the scale of diving from the 10 metre platform – the random use of the lifts will determine the act of diving.”

Artist Clare McCracken created her piece ‘Pace Maker’ by working with the flow of people moving in and out of the large foyer space.

“It is difficult to fully comprehend the achievement of the world’s Olympians, to work out exactly how impressive their skills are compared to the average human. Through performance, ‘Pacemaker’ will draw correlations between the everyday activity of the office worker and the accomplishments of our greatest athletes.”

The project was run with the support of The Global Cities Research Institute at RMIT University Melbourne Australia.

http://humanmovement.blogspot.com.au